Maternal side Ancestors Genealogy of Al-Husaini family, that can be traced in the Chinese History

by Nurfadhil Al-Alawi Al-Husaini
Source:
Maternal side Ancestors Genealogy of Al-Husaini family, that can be traced in the Chinese History, are from :
  • I. Li (Chinese: 李;pinyin: Lǐ; Hangul: 이, Lee) family of Han people Ethnic group : Dukes of Western Liang & Ruler of Tang Dynasty.
  • II. Yuan the branch family of the (拓拔; pinyin Tuòbá) Tuoba/T’opa clan, one of Xianbei people ethnic group; [This Yuan’s family surname : 元, In later centuries, declined and was sometimes subsumed by the more common form of Yuan (袁)] : Rulers of Northern Wei & Western WeiDynasty.
  • III. Juqu Clan;  突厥 (Tūjué) ethnic groups, ancestor of turkey people : Leaders of the Chinese / Xiongnu state Northern Liang, Chiefs & Kings Of Göktürks -Turkic Khaganate
  • IV. Yang 楊 / 杨 Clan Family : Ruler of Sui Dynasty.
  • V. Yuwen (simplified Chinese:宇文; traditional Chinese: 宇文) family, as descendant of Xianbei Yuwen tribe :  Rulers of Northern ZhouDynasty.
I. Li (Chinese: 李;pinyin: Lǐ; Hangul: 이, Lee) family of Han people Ethnic group :
Source: Li surname
Some Famous Ancestors of this family lineage are :
  1. Huang-di, (黃帝/黄帝 huángdì) or the Yellow Emperor, his surname is Gōngsūn (公孫), while his first name is Xuānyuán (軒轅). His full name was Gōngsūn Xuānyuán (公孫軒轅). [Emperor of Tang, Gao-Zu / Li Yuan’s 71st generation ancestor]
  2. Huang Lizen change the family name of “Huang” into “Li”. [Emperor of Tang, Gao-Zu / Li Yuan’s 65th generation ancestor]
  3. Lĭ Guăng (Chinese: 李廣; Wade-Giles: Li Kuang, d. 119 BC), was a famous general of the Han Dynasty. Nicknamed The Flying General by his Xiongnu enemies (Chinese:飛將軍李廣)
They are descdendings :
  1. Li Chang (李昶) (d. 350 or 351), posthumously honored as Duke Jian
  2. Li Gao (李暠) (351 – 417), courtesy name Xuansheng (玄盛), nickname Changsheng (長生), formally Prince Wuzhao of (Western) Liang ((西)涼武昭王), was the founding duke of the Chinese state Western Liáng + Lady Yin / Princess Dowager Yin from Tianshui.
  3. Li Xin (李歆) (died 420), courtesy name Shiye (士業), nickname Tongzhui (桐椎), was a duke of the Chinese state Western Liáng.
  4. Li Chong’er (李重耳) the Heir Apparent, later official under Liu Song and Northern Wei
  5. Li Xi
  6. Li Tianxi
  7. Li Hu, (李虎) major general under Western Wei later Duke Xiang of Longxi
  8. Li Ping / Li Bing (李昺) inherited the title of the Duke Ren of Tang + married a daughter of the prominent general Dugu Xin (獨孤信) Tang_Dynasty
  9. Emperor Gāozǔ of Táng (566 – June 25, 635), born Lǐ Yuān (李淵), courtesy name Shūdé (叔德), was the founder of the Tang Dynasty of China, and the first emperor of this dynasty from 618 to 626. Under the Sui dynasty, Li Yuan was the governor in the area of modern-day Shanxi, and was based in Taiyuan.
  10. Princess dau. Gao-Zu, Emperor of China,Tang Dynasty + Sharíyár Sháh of Persia
  11. Yazdigird III Sásání, last pre-Islamic King of Persia (16 June 632-651) + Manyanh Princess of Roman Byzantium, “have daughter” :
  12. Shahrbānū (or Shahr Banu) (Persian: شهربانو) (Meaning: “Lady of the Land”) Other names by which she has been referred to include: Shaharbānawayh, Shahzanān, Salāma, Salāfa, Ghazāla, Salama, and Sādira + Imam Husein (bin Imam Ali + Fathimah binti Prophet Muhammad PBUH); “have son” :
  13. Imam Ali Zainal Abidin Al-Husaini ancestor of Al-Husaini saadah family (+ Fathimah binti Imam Hasan bin Imam Ali + Fathimah Az-Zahra binti Prophet Mohammad PBUH)
II. From Yuan family of the Tuoba/T’opa clan, one of Xianbei people ethnic group. (were a significant nomadic people residing in Manchuria and eastern Mongolia,or Xianbei Shan)
Source: Xianbei and Tuoba
  1. Tuoba Liwei (Chinese:拓拔力微; pinyin: Tuòbá Lìwéi) was thefirst leader / chieftain of the Tuoba clanof the Xianbei people, from 219-277 descendant of Donghu People. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Donghu_people>
  2. Tuoba Shamohan (拓跋沙漠汗)
  3. Tuoba Fu (Chinese:拓跋弗; pinyin: Tuòbá Fú),chieftain of the Tuoba(293-294)
  4. Tuoba Yulü (Chinese:拓跋鬱律; pinyin: Tuòbá Yùlǜ) ruled as prince of the Tuoba Dai 316 to 321.
  5. Tuoba Shiyijian (Chinese:拓跋什翼犍; pinyin: Tuòbá Shíyìjiàn)(320-376) was the last prince of the Tuoba Daiand ruled from 338 to 376 when Dai was conquered by the Former Qin.
  6. Tuoba Shi (拓拔寔) + Heiress Apparent Helan (d. 396) /Princess Dowager Helan (賀蘭太后,) (351-396), formally Empress Xianming (獻明皇后) <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Northern_Wei>
  7. Dao Wu Di (道武帝) / Emperor Daowu, the First Emperor of Northern Wei (北)魏道武帝) (371-409), personal name Tuoba Gui (拓拔珪) +1.Consort Liu, posthumously honored as Empress Xuanmu daughter of Xiongnu chief LiuToujuan (劉頭眷)+2. princess of Paekche daughter of Kun Kusu(King) of PAEKCHE (BAEKJE) Korea (? – 384+)
  8. T’opa Si ofXi-Wei / Emperor Mingyuan of Northern Wei (北)魏明元帝) (392-423 AD), personal name Tuoba Si (拓拔嗣)+ Consort Duguhun (d. 420), posthumously honored as Empress Mi
  9. Emperor Taiwu of Northern Wei (北)魏太武帝)(408-452), personal name Tuoba Tao (拓拔燾), nickname Foli (佛貍) +Consort He (賀夫人)/ Consort Helai or Helan (d. 428) posthumously honored as Empress Jing’ai
  10. T’o-pa Yuan / TuobaHuang (拓拔晃)(428-July 29, 451),formally Crown Prince Jingmu (景穆太子) (literally “the decisiveand solemn crown prince”), later further formally honored as EmperorJingmu (景穆皇帝)+ Consort Yujiulü, sister of Yujiulü Pi (郁久閭毗)the Prince of Hedong, posthumously honored as Empress Gong
  11. Wen Cheng Di (文成帝) /  Tuoba Jun (拓拔濬) Emperorof Northern Wei China (452-465) + Consort Li (dead on 456), posthumouslyhonored as Empress Yuan
  12. Xian Wen Di (獻文帝)/  Tuoba Hong / Emperorof Northern Wei China (466-471) + Consort Li (d. 469), daughter of LiHui (李惠)the Prince of Nan Commandery, posthumously honored as Empress Si) <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yuan_%28surname%29#Adoption_by_non-Han_peoples>
  13. Xiao Wen Di (孝文帝)/ Yuan Hong (元宏)Emperor of Northern Wei China(471-499)  +  Consort Yuan
  14. Yuan Yu (元愉), the Prince of Jingzhao + LadyYang, posthumously honored as Empress Wenjing <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Western_Wei_Dynasty>
  15. Emperor Xi-Wei Wen-Ti / EmperorWen of Western Wei (西)魏文帝) (507-551) / Yuan Baoju (元寶炬) “have daughter” :
  16. Princess Anle / Princess Changle of Western Wei/ Princess Ch’ang-lo of China + Bumin Assena, 1st King of Turks(545) Bumin Qaghan (Old Turkic:,Bumïn qaγan) or Illig Qaghan (Chinese:伊利可汗,Pinyin: yīlìkěhàn, Wade-Giles:i-li k’o-han, death: 552 AD) was the founder of the TurkicKhaganate. He was the eldest son of Tuwu Tayehu [Tsugu T’u-u Mengen], (Look III.6 Lineage) chief of the Turks 523-545; He was the chieftain of the Turkic people who wasso-called “blacksmith slave” (鍛奴 /锻奴,Pinyin: duàn nú, Wade-Giles: tuan-nu) under the sovereignty of RouranKhaganate. And he is mentioned as “Tumen” (土門, 吐門,commander of ten thousand) of the Rouran Khaganate. (Look lineage) “Have daughter” :
  17. Princess Kayen of the Turks +  KhusrawI (the Just) 20th Sásání king of Persia (reigned 531–579),

“have son” :
Sassanid_dynasty

  1. HormizdIV 21st Sásání king of Persia (reigned 579–590)+ Princess daughter of Khurad, King of the Hephthalites
  2. KhusrawII (Parvez) 22nd Sásání king of Persia reigning from 590-628 + Princess Sirin of Turkestan (Look III.11 & IV.7 Lineages )
  3. Sharíyár Sásání, Sháh of Persia + Princess dau. Gao-Zu, Emperor of China (Look I.9 Lineage)
  4. YazdigirdIII Sásání, last pre-Islamic King of Persia (16 June 632-651)+ Manyanh Princess of Roman Byzantium, “have daughter” :
  5. Shahrbānū (or Shahr Banu) (Persian:شهربانو) (Meaning: “Lady of the Land”) Other names by which she has beenreferred to include: Shaharbānawayh, Shahzanān, Salāma, Salāfa,Ghazāla, Salama, and Sādira + Imam Husein (bin Imam Ali +Fathimah Az-Zahra binti Prophet Muhammad PBUH); “have son” :
  6. Imam Ali Zainal Abidin Al-Husainiancestor of Al-Husaini sa’adah family (+ Fathimah binti Imam Hasan bin Imam Ali+ Fathimah Az-Zahra binti Prophet Mohammad PBUH)
III. From the Juqu Clan;  突厥 (Tūjué) ethnic groups, ancestor of turkey people
  1. Juqu Mengxun (沮渠蒙遜) (368-433) / Tsugu Meng Sun / Ashina [Ashihna] [Asena], was a prince of the Chinese/Xiongnu state Northern Liang, and the first from the Juqu clan. He revolted against Chinese vassalage and broke free achieving independence for China’s northern Liang province; duke of the Turks [or Liang] 398, chief/king 406 (d433), eponym of the Assena clan
  2. Juqu Anzhou (沮渠安周) / Apangpu [Tsugu-Pieng-Sun], (died 460) chief/king of the Turks 433-460, led migration of the Turks from China’s northern Liang province to China’s western Xinjiang province, and settled in Kan-suh, near the modern city of Shan-Tan, where the Turkish royal citadel was built on the near-by hill so-called “Turku”, “Diirkii”, or “T’u-chueh” for the tribe’s national name, onetime the Turks’ capital-city, and, ancestor state of the later Avarite Khanate (562-796) [vassals of the powerful Juan-Juan empire (c450-545)]
  3. Hsien I, chief of the Turks 461-490
  4. Liangu, chief of the Turks 496-511
  5. Mengen, chief of the Turks 521-523
  6. Juqu / Tuwu Tayehu [Tsugu T’u-u Mengen], chief of the Turks 523-545                                                  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/G%C3%B6kt%C3%BCrk_Ka%C4%9Fans

  7. Istämi (Old Turkic: , Estemi qaγan, 室點密/室点密, Pinyin: shìdiǎnmì, Wade-Giles: shih- tien-mi, 室點蜜/室点蜜, 瑟帝米) Istemi [Silzibul] [Iski Khan] (d576) was the ruler of the western part of the Göktürks, the Western Turkic Khaganate and dominated the Sogdians. Brother of Bumin Assena / Bumin Qaghan 1st King of Turks (545) (Look II.16+ Lineage)
  8. Ishbara Qaghan (Old Turkic: , Ϊšbara qaγan, 沙缽略可汗/沙钵略可汗, Pinyin: shābōlüè kěhàn, Wade-Giles: sha-po-lüeh, alternative names: Shapolo, full name: Il Kül Shad Bagha Ishbara Qaghan 伊利俱盧設莫何始波羅可汗/伊利俱卢设莫何始波罗可汗, personal name: 阿史那攝圖/阿史那摄图, āshǐnà shètú, a-shih-na she-t’u) / Shaporo [III] [Shetu Yabgu] [Che-Thu] [Yshbar Khan],  the fifth khagan of the first Eastern Turkic Khaganate 581 – 587 + Princess Qianjin / Princess Eying of Northern Zhou 千金公主 (Look IV.4 Lineage) After the fall of Northen Zhou, she was given surname Yang and became Princess Dayi of Sui 大義公主 / 大义公主
  9. Yаmi Qaghan  599—609 (Old Turkic: , Jаmï qaγan, Chinese: 啓民可汗, 啟民可汗/启民可汗, Modern Chinese: (Pinyin): qǐmín kěhàn, (Wade-Giles): ch’i-min k’o-han, Middle Chinese: (Guangyun): kʰiei˥-mĭĕn˩ kʰɑ˥-ɣɑn˩˥), personal name: Ashina Jankan (阿史那染幹/阿史那染干, āshǐnà rǎngān, a-shih-na jan-kan, ʔɑ-ʃĭə˥-nɑ˩ nʑĭɛm˥-kɑn˩˥), at one point known as Tolis Qaghan (突利可汗, , Töles qaγan) and after (意利珍豆啟民可汗/意利珍豆启民可汗, yìlì zhēndòu qǐmín kěhàn, yi-li-chen-tou ch’i-min k’o-han) the eighth qaghan of the Eastern Turkic Khaganate + Princess Anyi 安義公主 / 安义公主 (597 – 599) From Sui
  10. Shibi Khagan Shipi [Shih-Pi] [Dugi Shibir Khan] [Tujieli], /  (Chinese: 始畢可汗/始毕可汗, Modern Chinese: (Pinyin): shǐbì kěhàn, (Wade-Giles): shih-pi k’o-han, Middle Chinese: (Guangyun): ɕĭə˥-pĭĕt kʰɑ˥-ɣɑn˩˥, personal name: 阿史那咄吉世, āshǐnà duōjíshì, a-shih-na to-chi-shih), 611 – 619 AD the ninth khagan of the Eastern Turkic Khaganate + Princess Yicheng 義成公主 / 义成公主 (599 – ) From Sui
  11. Princess Sirin of Turkestan + Khusraw II (Parvez) Sásání, 22nd Sháh of Persia reigning from 590-628
  12. Sharíyár Sásání, Sháh of Persia = Princess dau. Gao-Zu, Emperor of China (Look I.9 Lineage)
  13. Yazdigird III Sásání, last pre-Islamic Sháh of Persia (16 June 632-651) + Manyanh Princess of Roman Byzantium. “have daughter” :
  14. Shahrbānū (or Shahr Banu) (Persian: شهربانو) (Meaning: “Lady of the Land”) Other names by which she has been referred to include: Shaharbānawayh, Shahzanān, Salāma, Salāfa, Ghazāla, Salama, and Sādira + Imam Husein (bin Imam Ali + Fathimah Az-Zahra binti Nabi Muhammad SAW); “have son” :
  15. Imam Ali Zainal Abidin Al-Husaini ancestor of Al-Husaini sa’adah family (+ Fathimah binti Imam Hasan bin Imam Ali + Fathimah binti Prophet Mohammad PBUH)
IV. From Yang (楊 / 杨) Clan Family
Yang Zhong (楊忠), Duke Huan of Sui (d. 568)                                                                                 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sui_Dynasty
  1. Sui-Wenti / Emperor Wen of Sui (541-604), personal name Yang Jian (楊堅), Xianbei name Puliuru Jian (普六茹堅), nickname Naluoyan (那羅延), was the founder and first emperor of China’s Sui Dynasty, Reign as Emperor on 581-604 + Empress Dugu Qieluo (獨孤伽羅) (544-September 10, 602[1]), formally Empress Wenxian (文獻皇后) as the 7th daughter of the Western Wei general Dugu Xin (獨孤信)
  2. Empress Yang Lihua (楊麗華) (561-609) was an empress of the Chinese/Xianbei dynasty Northern Zhou, and later a princess of Sui Dynasty + Emperor Xuan of Northern Zhou (北)周宣帝) (559-580), personal name Yuwen Yun (宇文贇), courtesy name Qianbo (乾伯), was an emperor of the Chinese/Xianbei dynasty Northern Zhou
  3. Princess Qianjin / Princess Eying of Northern Zhou 千金公主 After the fall of Northern Zhou, she was given surname Yang and became Princess Dayi of Sui 大義公主 / 大义公主 + Ishbara Qaghan (Old Turkic: , Ϊšbara qaγan, 沙缽略可汗/沙钵略可汗, Pinyin: shābōlüè kěhàn, Wade-Giles: sha-po-lüeh, alternative names: Shapolo, full name: Il Kül Shad Bagha Ishbara Qaghan 伊利俱盧設莫何始波羅可汗/伊利俱卢设莫何始波罗可汗, personal name: 阿史那攝圖/阿史那摄图, āshǐnà shètú, a-shih-na she-t’u) / Shaporo [III] [Shetu Yabgu] [Che-Thu] [Yshbar Khan],  the fifth khagan of the first Eastern Turkic Khaganate 581 – 587
  4. Yаmi Qaghan  599—609 (Old Turkic: , Jаmï qaγan, Chinese: 啓民可汗, 啟民可汗/启民可汗, Modern Chinese: (Pinyin): qǐmín kěhàn, (Wade-Giles): ch’i-min k’o-han, Middle Chinese: (Guangyun): kʰiei˥-mĭĕn˩ kʰɑ˥-ɣɑn˩˥), personal name: Ashina Jankan (阿史那染幹/阿史那染干, āshǐnà rǎngān, a-shih-na jan-kan, ʔɑ-ʃĭə˥-nɑ˩ nʑĭɛm˥-kɑn˩˥), at one point known as Tolis Qaghan (突利可汗, , Töles qaγan) and after (意利珍豆啟民可汗/意利珍豆启民可汗, yìlì zhēndòu qǐmín kěhàn, yi-li-chen-tou ch’i-min k’o-han) the eighth qaghan of the Eastern Turkic Khaganate + Princess Anyi 安義公主 / 安义公主 (597 – 599) From Sui
  5. Shibi Khagan / Shipi [Shih-Pi] [Dugi Shibir Khan] [Tujieli], /  (Chinese: 始畢可汗/始毕可汗, Modern Chinese: (Pinyin): shǐbì kěhàn, (Wade-Giles): shih-pi k’o-han, Middle Chinese: (Guangyun): ɕĭə˥-pĭĕt kʰɑ˥-ɣɑn˩˥, personal name: 阿史那咄吉世, āshǐnà duōjíshì, a-shih-na to-chi-shih), 611 – 619 AD, the ninth khagan of the Eastern Turkic Khaganate + Princess Yicheng 義成公主 / 义成公主 (599 – ) From Sui
  6. Princess Sirin of Turkestan + Khusraw II (Parvez) Sásání, 22nd Sháh of Persia reigning from 590-628.
  7. Sharíyár Sásání, Sháh of Persia + Princess dau. Gao-Zu, Emperor of China, Tang dynasti
  8. Yazdigird III Sásání, last pre-Islamic Sháh of Persia (16 June 632-651) + Manyanh Princess of Roman Byzantium. “have daughter” :
  9. Shahrbānū (or Shahr Banu) (Persian: شهربانو) (Meaning: “Lady of the Land”) Other names by which she has been referred to include: Shaharbānawayh, Shahzanān, Salāma, Salāfa, Ghazāla, Salama, and Sādira + Imam Husein (bin Imam Ali + Fathimah Az-Zahra binti Nabi Muhammad SAW); “have son” :
  10. Imam Ali Zainal Abidin Al-Husaini ancestor of Al-Husaini sa’adah family (+ Fathimah binti Imam Hasan bin Imam Ali + Fathimah Az-Zahra binti Prophet Mohammad PBUH)
V. FromYuwen (simplified Chinese:宇文; traditionalChinese: 宇文) family, as descendant of Xianbei Yuwen tribe
  1. Yuwen Gong (宇文肱) (d. 526?), posthumously honored as Emperor De, descendant of the last chieftain of the Xianbei Yuwen tribe; Yuwen Yidougui
  2. Yuwen Tai (Chinese: 宇文泰; pinyin: Yǔwén Tài) (507-556), nickname Heita (黑獺), formally Duke Wen of Anding (安定文公), later further posthumously honored by Northern Zhou initially as Prince Wen (文王) then as Emperor Wen (文皇帝) with the temple name Taizu (太祖), was the paramount general of the Chinese/Xianbei state Western Wei, a branch successor state of Northern Wei.                                                                                                                               http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Northern_Zhou
  3. Emperor Wu of Northern Zhou ((北)周武帝) (543-578), personal name Yuwen Yong (宇文邕), nickname Miluotu (禰羅突) + Consort Li Ezi / Empress Dowager Li Ezi (李娥姿) (536-588), later Buddhist nun name Changbei (常悲)
  4. Emperor Xuan of Northern Zhou (北)周宣帝) (559-580), personal name Yuwen Yun (宇文贇), courtesy name Qianbo (乾伯), was an emperor of the Chinese/Xianbei dynasty Northern Zhou + Empress Yang Lihua (楊麗華) (561-609) princess of Sui Dynasty
  5. Princess Qianjin / Princess Eying of Northern Zhou 千金公主 After the fall of Northen Zhou, she was given surname Yang and became Princess Dayi of Sui 大義公主 / 大义公主 + Ishbara Qaghan (look (Old Turkic: , Ϊšbara qaγan[1], 沙缽略可汗/沙钵略可汗, Pinyin: shābōlüè kěhàn, Wade-Giles: sha-po-lüeh, alternative names: Shapolo, full name: Il Kül Shad Bagha Ishbara Qaghan 伊利俱盧設莫何始波羅可汗/伊利俱卢设莫何始波罗可汗, personal name: 阿史那攝圖/阿史那摄图, āshǐnà shètú, a-shih-na she-t’u) / Shaporo [III] [Shetu Yabgu] [Che-Thu] [Yshbar Khan],  the fifth khagan of the first Eastern Turkic Khaganate 581 – 587 (Look Lineage)
  6. Yаmi Qaghan  599—609 (Old Turkic: , Jаmï qaγan, Chinese: 啓民可汗, 啟民可汗/启民可汗, Modern Chinese: (Pinyin): qǐmín kěhàn, (Wade-Giles): ch’i-min k’o-han, Middle Chinese: (Guangyun): kʰiei˥-mĭĕn˩ kʰɑ˥-ɣɑn˩˥), personal name: Ashina Jankan (阿史那染幹/阿史那染干, āshǐnà rǎngān, a-shih-na jan-kan, ʔɑ-ʃĭə˥-nɑ˩ nʑĭɛm˥-kɑn˩˥), at one point known as Tolis Qaghan (突利可汗, , Töles qaγan) and after (意利珍豆啟民可汗/意利珍豆启民可汗, yìlì zhēndòu qǐmín kěhàn, yi-li-chen-tou ch’i-min k’o-han) the eighth qaghan of the Eastern Turkic Khaganate + Princess Anyi 安義公主 / 安义公主 (597 – 599) From Sui
  7. Shibi Khagan Shipi [Shih-Pi] [Dugi Shibir Khan] [Tujieli], /  (Chinese: 始畢可汗/始毕可汗, Modern Chinese: (Pinyin): shǐbì kěhàn, (Wade-Giles): shih-pi k’o-han, Middle Chinese: (Guangyun): ɕĭə˥-pĭĕt kʰɑ˥-ɣɑn˩˥, personal name: 阿史那咄吉世, āshǐnà duōjíshì, a-shih-na to-chi-shih), 611 – 619 AD the ninth khagan of the Eastern Turkic Khaganate + Princess Yicheng 義成公主 / 义成公主 From Sui
  8. Princess Sirin of Turkestan + Khusraw II (Parvez) Sásání, 22nd Sháh of Persia reigning from 590-628.
  9. Sharíyár Sásání, Sháh of Persia = Princess dau. Gao-Zu, Emperor of China, Tang Dynasti (Look I lineage)
  10. Yazdigird III Sásání, last pre-Islamic Sháh of Persia (16 June 632-651) + Manyanh Princess of Roman Byzantium. “have daughter” :
  11. Shahrbānū (or Shahr Banu) (Persian: شهربانو) (Meaning: “Lady of the Land”) Other names by which she has been referred to include: Shaharbānawayh, Shahzanān, Salāma, Salāfa, Ghazāla, Salama, and Sādira + Imam Husein (bin Imam Ali + Fathimah Az-Zahra binti Nabi Muhammad SAW); “have son” :
  12. Imam Ali Zainal Abidin Al-Husaini ancestor of Al-Husaini sa’adah family (+ Fathimah binti Imam Hasan bin Imam Ali + Fathimah Az-Zahra binti Prophet Mohammad PBUH)

Mengungkap nasab (silsilah garis laki) ke rasul bisa berbahaya disalah gunakan orang.. kalo ini buat pengetahuan aja tentang ilmu “genealogy” silsilah leluhur garis perempuan Imam Ali Zainal Abidin (leluhur para habaib Al-Husaini) ke tokoh2 sejarah di China. Semoga bisa diambil hikmah bagi keturunannya untuk meneladani yang baik, misal sebagai pemimpin yang bermanfaat bagi suatu kaumnya. Dan menyadari semua manusia bersaudara, dan tidaklah Allah / Tuhan menciptakan berbagai bangsa supaya saling kenal mengenal.

Kebetulan ttg ini para ahli nasab arab tidak merasa berkepentingan mendatanya.. tapi bagi peminat ilmu “genealogy” semoga ini bisa menambah wawasan kita..


Declaration of ‘Ulama on the Gold Dinar

A Group of ‘Ulama – at the 4th Muslim Lawyers’ Conference

A Gathering of ‘Ulama
Discuss the Zakat, the Dinar of Islam, markets and the Awqaf
There is no disagreement about what you say…

At the 4th Muslim Lawyers’ Conference in Potsdam 29th June – 1st July 2001, a group of ‘ulama and imams assembled to discuss the zakat and related matters. The names of those present are appended below the statement issued after the gathering.

To open the meeting, Hajj Asadullah Yate, Imam of the Muslim community of Potsdam, presented an outline of matters of great urgency.

First, he spoke of the disaster inherent in the fact that the Muslims are using paper money for their transactions, since it is:

  • not small change in the classical sense of flous minted from copper or nickel for transactions under the value of silver and gold,
  • originally a debt, transacting with which is completely forbidden in the fiqh,
  • and is at present a ‘fiat’ money of no worth at all.

Second, it is even more distressing that the Muslims pay their zakat in paper money and as a personal charity, when the correct form is that zakat must be collected by zakat collectors appointed by an amir, and that it must be collected in gold and silver.

Third, he drew attention to the obligation upon amirs to establish markets in which no one may reserve a place, but in which anyone who shows up there after the dawn prayer may take any place that is free for the day. No one may charge rent on such a market place nor impose a tax on the trade done there.

Fourth, that we have forgotten the awqaf-endowments of Islam, one of whose essential pre-conditions is that they are properties dedicated to a purpose ‘forever’. These endowments were responsible for a great deal of social welfare within the Muslim community.

In response to this, Muhammad ‘Amrawi spoke and said that there is no disagreement on these matters at all, and that they are all too well known in the fiqh. However, he added that this was the first time that he or any of the other assembled ‘ulama have heard someone saying such things in this time. He added that all that is lacking is a practical way to implement them.

Imam Abu Sayf and Muhammad ‘Amrawi both cautioned against putting the Muslims in the difficult position of telling them that the transactions they make using paper money are incorrect or that the mode in which they pay their zakat is incorrect, without first creating ways for them to transact properly, e.g. by bringing about such markets for the Muslims to trade in, and minting dinars and dirhams with which they can pay their zakat.

In terms of practical implementations, Imam Hajj Asadullah mentioned the long history of Murabitun communities minting coins in Germany, South Africa, Spain, England and Scotland. Another participant drew everyone’s attention to the recent market in Dubai, which, with the support of the state of Dubai, issued gold dinars that people purchased at the door for use in the market.

Muhammad al-‘Amrawi said that the fatwa of Shaykh ‘Illish concerning the impermissibility of paying zakat upon or with paper money is well known in this respect. He again cautioned against disheartening the Muslims, and advised that as soon as possible practical steps need to be taken to make gold dinars and silver dirhams available to the Muslims to pay zakat, and concomitantly the need for the creation of Islamic markets, as described above, in which the Muslims may use their dinars and dirhams, since there is little use in giving a poor and needy person a gold coin which he cannot spend. Again he stressed that there is no disagreement on these matters in the fiqh, but that all that is lacking is a practical programme of their implementation.

Given the unanimity of the ‘ulama, imams and fuqaha assembled, it was agreed to draw up a statement to this effect, to be signed by everyone present, which would draw the Muslims’ attention to the seriousness of the situation pertaining to the ordinary transactions of Islam in the market place, and the dormant pillar of zakat.

Explanation and Clarification by ‘Ulama of the European Muslims

Praise belongs to Allah, Lord of the worlds, and blessings and peace be upon our master the Messenger of Allah, may Allah bless him and grant him peace, and upon all his family and Companions.

We here assembled in Potsdam on 30/6/2001, after our studying together the following subjects:

  1. The danger of usury for Muslims in their deen and for the world economy.
  2. The importance of the awqaf in the Islamic shari’ah according to the fact that they are means for making good projects; both in knowledge and in action; continuous.
  3. The compelling and urgent need there is to return the role of zakat with respect to the fact that it as one of the fundamental acts of worship of Islam and because of its importance from both the social and the economic points of view, and the compelling and urgent need there is to pay it according to the detailed injunctions of the shari’ah, a part of which is taking care to pay it in the currency of the shari’ah [gold dinars and silver dirhams].
  4. The compelling and urgent need there is to return to the use of the money of the shari’ah as represented by gold and silver.
  5. The obligation there is to teach the judgements concerning the marketplace considering the fact that eating the halal depends upon that.
  6. The importance of returning respect to shari’ah authority [the amir] in its description as the one responsible for: taking the zakat, distributing it, the organisation of the hisbah [supervision of market processes to see that they are free of usury and other haram transactions], and structuring the awqaf and other affairs which are its function.

We suggest:

  1. The encouragement of the teaching of these matters in our gatherings of knowledge, our schools for learning the deen, our Islamic centres, and our shari’ah institutes.
  2. Warning the Muslims of the urgent need there is to be concerned about these matters.
  3. Calling on Muslim ‘ulama and traders to join in and embark upon returning respect for the shari’ah currency [the gold dinar and silver dirham] according to their capacities and their possibilities for doing that.

And Allah is the One who grants success in doing the right thing and He is the One Who guides on the way.

Signed:

  • Muhammad al-‘Amraawi, member of the Association of Moroccan Ulama, Rissaani, Tafilet, Morocco
  • Al-Khammar al-Baqqaali, Imam, The Hague, Holland
  • Ahmad Saabir, Imam, Holland
  • Al-Hussayn ibn Haashim, Imam
  • Abu Sayf Kharkhaash, founder of the World Association of Fuqaha, director of the Cultural Centre for Islamic Research, Berlin
  • Mubarak Sa’doun al-Mutawwa’, Human Rights Lawyer, Kuwait
  • Malik Abu Hamza Sezgin, Turk-European conference co-ordinator, Maliki scholar.
  • Abdassamad Clarke, Imam and Maliki scholar.
  • Asadullah Yate, Imam, Potsdam Academy, Germany

Islam i dag